More Shepherd Facts

German shepherds are actually made of Velcro

It is a little-known fact about German shepherds that they are actually made of Velcro (OK, not literally). While not all shepherds are clingy, you can be sure your GSD will never be too far from you, whether you are going to the bathroom, taking a shower, gardening, watching TV, cooking or taking a nap. GSDs take loyalty very seriously.

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They're not ideal for first-time owners

German shepherds can be a handful. They require consistent training and a level of experience that makes them a poor choice for first-time dog owners. If you do choose to adopt a GSD for your first dog, make sure you work with an experienced trainer so that your GSD does not develop any potentially dangerous or destructive habits.

Not all landlords love German shepherds

Sadly, German shepherds are not always welcomed by landlords. Adopting a GSD might not be a good idea if you are renting. If you are renting, make sure to ask your landlord or property manager if you can have a GSD in your rental before you bring one home.

You can’t have just one

Adopting a German shepherd might seem like a harmless decision. What you might not realize is that German shepherds are like potato chips. You can't have just one. You might find yourself owning German shepherds the rest of your life, which really means you’ve been adopted into the German shepherd family — not the other way around.

They're dog people

If you're seriously considering adopting a German shepherd, you should know that there are dog people, and then there are German shepherd dog people. I would be lost without my German shepherd, and she knows it. And while you've probably already done a little research on your own, some advice can only come from an experienced GSD lover. So here are the 10 things you really need to know before adopting a German shepherd.

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German shepherds are a special breed — know what you're getting yourself into before bringing one home
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Rin Tin Tin
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The first 'Rin Tin Tin', who along with his heirs starred in numerous films and television series, was discovered during World War I, September 15, 1918, by US Air Corporal Lee Duncan and his battalion in Lorraine, France. At a bombed out dog kennel, Duncan found a mother Shepherd Dog and her scrawny litter of five pups. Duncan chose two of the dogs, a male and female, while members of his group took the mother and the others back to camp. The only survivors over the next few months were the two pups Duncan had claimed, naming them 'Rin Tin Tin' and 'Nannette' after tiny French puppets the French children would give to the American soldiers for good luck. When the war ended, Duncan made special arrangements to take his pups back to his home in Los Angeles, but during the Atlantic crossing, Nannette became ill and died, shortly after arriving in America. In 1922, Duncan and Rin Tin Tin attended an LA dog show, with 'Rinty' performing for the crowd by jumping 13 ½ feet. Following the show, producer Darryl Zanuck asked Duncan if he could try out his new 'moving pictures' camera on the dog and paid $350 to film Rinty in action. Contacting every studio in Hollywood with a Rin Tin Tin -starring script "Where The North Begins", Duncan unexpectedly stumbled onto a low-budget, Warner Bros (Vitaphone) film crew having difficulty shooting an exterior scene with a wolf. Duncan quickly approached the director and told them that Rinty could do the scene in one take. True to his word, Duncan's 'wonder' dog did the scene in one take and both were hired for the entire shoot of "Man From Hells River". The film was a hit and Rin Tin Tin was a sensation, making 26 pictures for Warners while starring in his own live 1930s radio show "The Wonder Dog". At the peak of his popularity, Warners maintained 18 trained stand-ins to reduce any stress on their dog star, while providing Rinty with a private chef who prepared daily lunches of tenderloin steak (consumed as live classical music was played to help ease the dog's digestion.) Rin Tin Tin died in 1932 at the age of 14, returned to his birthplace in France, and interred in "The Cimetière des Chiens (et Autres Animaux Exotiques)" in the suburb of Asnieres. Today, Rin Tin Tin's continuous bloodline carries on at a Texas kennel, where a litter of 8-11 pups are born each year.

5 Comments

  1. like this August 8, 2019

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